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9/27/18 - This page is hidden from public view based on the deprecation of Windows Phone.


To sign a Windows Phone app using the signing package, you need:

  • An enterprise certificate in Personal Information Exchange (.pfx) format. Use this same certificate to sign any native Windows Phone apps that you will distribute through Apperian, including the Windows Phone App Catalog.
  • A Microsoft Windows machine that meets the system requirements listed below.

For more information on supported Windows app file formats, see Windows App File Formats.

Enterprise Certificate

You must sign all the Windows Phone applications you upload to Apperian (including the Windows Phone App Catalog) with the same enterprise certificate. This certificate needs to be in PFX (.pfx) format.

If you do not already have an enterprise certificate, you can acquire one from Symantec through the Windows Phone Dev Center, and then export it in PFX format using the Certificates snap-in on the computer where the certificate was imported.

To do this, you need a company account on Windows Phone Dev Center. For instructions on registering on Windows Phone Dev Center and acquiring the enterprise certificate, see the Windows Phone Dev Center documentation. For frequently asked questions about a Symantec enterprise certificate, see the Symantec Code Signing Information Center.

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Signing Machine System Requirements

To use the Windows Phone app signing package, you need a machine that meets the requirements listed in the following table.

Warning

The signing package will run on a machine that does not meet all the requirements, but users will not be able to install the signed app.

Operating SystemWindows 8.0/8.1 Pro or Enterprise (64-bit)
Installed Software

 

To sign XAP apps built for Windows Phone 8.0, you need:

To sign XAP and APPX apps built for Windows Phone 8.1, you need:

Windows Phone 8.0 SDK

If it is not already installed, download the SDK from here.

Windows Phone 8.1 SDK

If it is not already installed, download the SDK from here.

Microsoft Silverlight (latest version)

If it is not already installed, download it from here.

Symantec Enterprise Mobile Root for Microsoft certificate

Download the certificate from here and install it with the Certificate Import Wizard. When prompted to specify a location for the certificate, do not accept the default location; select Place all certificates in the following store and then browse to select Trusted Root Certification Authorities.

Symantec Enterprise Mobile CA for Microsoft certificate

Download the certificate from here and install it with the Certificate Import Wizard. When prompted to specify a location for the certificate, do not accept the default location; select Place all certificates in the following store and then browse to select Intermediate Root Certification Authorities.

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Check the Expiration Date of a Windows Phone Certificate

If you have access to a Windows computer with the Windows Phone certificate installed, you can check the expiration date from the Internet Properties dialog. If you have the PFX file but do not have access to a computer where it is installed, you can check the expiration date at the command line.    

From the Internet Properties Dialog

If you have access to a Windows computer with the Windows Phone certificate installed, follow these steps to check the expiration date:

  1. Open Internet Properties.

  2. Click the Content tab.

  3. Click Certificates to open the Certificates dialog.

  4. Look at the Expiration column for the date listed for the certificate issued by Symantec Enterprise. 

From the Command Line

As an Administrator, you may have access to the PFX (.pfx file) generated from your company's Windows Phone enterprise certificate, but you may not have a Windows computer with the certificate installed on it, or the credentials for logging in to the Windows Phone Dev Center to check the status of a certificate. Use one of the following commands to check the expiration date of an enterprise certificate, using the .pfx file. 

On Linux or Mac OS

openssl pkcs12 -in filename.pfx -passin pass:password -nokeys | openssl x509 -noout -enddate

The output will include a notAfter date indicating when the certificate expires. For example:

MAC verified OK
notAfter=Mar 20 12:22:27 2016 GMT

On Windows

c:\Windows\System32\certutil.exe -p password -dump filename.pfx | findstr /R /C:"NotAfter"

The output will include NotAfter dates for each certificate in the chain. The third date is listed is the expiration date for the enterprise certificate. For example:

NotAfter: 15/03/2027 0:59
NotAfter: 15/03/2032 0:59
NotAfter: 20/03/2016 13:22

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